Politics, Policy, Economics - Since 2010

Anyone who signs up for Obama care signs away all privacy. Remarkable. Obama care is not HIPPA compliant, and CMS ordered the secret sourc...

Hidden Anti- HIPPA Compliant Source Code In HCR/ Obamacare


Anyone who signs up for Obama care signs away all privacy. Remarkable.
Obama care is not HIPPA compliant, and CMS ordered the secret source code?

From The Economist: Denying science is a bad habit among conservatives of all stripes: Paul Broun, a Georgia Republican who sits on the Hous...

Georgia Senate Race: A furious—and political—debate about the origins of mankind


From The Economist:

Denying science is a bad habit among conservatives of all stripes: Paul Broun, a Georgia Republican who sits on the House science committee (and who wants to run for the Senate), says evolution is a lie “straight from the pit of hell”. That’s pandering, not piety.


Read the full article here

The Atlantic is mark on with this op-ed. From day one - high school really - I have squirmed in my seat at the thought of eating a McRib. ...

Psychoanalysis of the McRib



The Atlantic is mark on with this op-ed. From day one - high school really - I have squirmed in my seat at the thought of eating a McRib. I am not a rib eater for the most part anyways, so why would I spring for a reconstructed pork patty made to look like it has edible ribs (?).

"By contrast, there is no world in which pork spare ribs could be eaten straight through, even after having been slow cooked such that some of the cartilage breaks down. "
- The Atlantic

This obviously leads to the chicken nuggets and how they are hardly chicken nuggets, but the main fact is that the McRib is a tad grosser and plays into our subconscious somehow, to some people. Not to mention, this seasonal monster is a success to the bottom line of an American corporation so iconic it parallels that of any other global brand. Is the McRib here to round out the menu?


Regardless, I favor the Big Mac.


From The Atlantic:

Each year, the McRib makes a brief visit to Earth. Its arrival elicits reactions ranging from horror to awe. And for good reason: this would-be rib sandwich is really a restructured pork patty pressed into the rough shape of a slab of ribs, its slathering of barbecue sauce acting as camouflage as much as coating.

“Pork” is a generous term, since the McRib has traditionally been fashionedfrom otherwise unmarketable pig parts like tripe, heart, and stomach, material that is not only cheap but also easier to mold and bind into a coherent, predetermined shape. McDonald’s accurately lists the patty’s primary ingredient as “boneless pork,” although even that’s a fairly strong euphemism. Presumably few of the restaurant’s patrons would line up for a Pressed McTripe.

Despite its abhorrence, the McRib bears remarkable similarity to another, more widely accepted McDonald’s product, the Chicken McNugget. In fact, the McRib was first introduced in 1982, shortly after the company had designed the McNugget. Chicken McNuggets are fashioned by the same method as is the McRib, namely by grinding factory-farmed chicken meat into a mash and then reconstituting them into a preservative-stabilized solid, aka a “nugget.” And both products are bound and preserved by a petrochemical preservative called tertiary butylhydroquinone, or TBHQ. According to the Consumer’s Dictionary of Food Additives, one gram of TBHQ can cause “nausea, vomiting, ringing in the ears, delirium, a sense of suffocation, and collapse.” In a 2003 lawsuit accusing McDonald’s of consumer deception, federal district court judge Robert W. Sweet called Chicken McNuggets a “McFrankenstein creation.”

Full Article Here

How interesting - enjoy the read. CSH Reposted From Resource Investor Silver Achilles Silver is a bigger 'problem' because CB's ...

Report - Precious Metals Manipulation - Gold and silver price manipulation from the top down



How interesting - enjoy the read. CSH


Reposted From Resource Investor


Silver Achilles


Silver is a bigger 'problem' because CB's don't have any physical metal to "inject" into the market in order to maintain the confidence game.


But probably not for long. And one might assume the end is very near, given how fragile/vulnerable the system is (especially the credit/REPO market) to "unforeseen" shocks, Black Swans, etc.


This is where I find it too easy to get carried away. One quick look around the macro world reveals a host of potential shocks. This would fuel the need and opportunity to build short-term predictions about current events (rationalized with evermore sophisticated technical or trading indicators).


Interpreting the Whistleblower


The work of GATA and Ted Butler dovetail somewhat. GATA has exposed the reality and legal mechanism for intervention. Ted focuses mainly on the details of how that intervention manifests in the trading data.


Backing up further, it's generally accepted by the "street" that the Fed, the Treasury or the ESF intervene all over the place — and that's perfectly okay. But mention of precious metals intervention remains a very successful (though ultimately destructive) taboo.


The ESF, with its broad authority and coordination with the Fed (and by proxy, the Fed's member banks) have the ability to control prices in both gold and silver. This also happens to be very profitable for the banks.


The giant banks are given carte blanche by the mainstream because they are so "successful," and “surely the man in the fancy suit is someone you can trust.” They are also too big to fail and/or prosecute.


Price suppression, controls, and manipulation are common occurrences. They have been observed and documented for practically all modern markets. And they always end eventually.


Just because it is legal does not make it right.


In the ultimate public relations triumph, the most economically destructive are actually perfectly acceptable by the majority of observers. However, the most dangerous to the financial system and the governments who serve them is the manipulation of the monetary metals.


Read Original Article

Bitcoin is growing in popularity everyday, and more and more individuals are trusting the currency. The recent spike in price per USD has on...

Dutch Food Delivery Website Takes Bitcoins

Bitcoin is growing in popularity everyday, and more and more individuals are trusting the currency. The recent spike in price per USD has only helped....

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Dutch Food Delivery Website Takes Bitcoins

The main website that arranges home delivery for restaurants in the Netherlands is now accepting payment in bitcoins, an increasingly popular form of digital currency.

Around 5,000 Dutch restaurants use the Thuisbezorgd.nl site to handle around 600,000 online orders and deliveries per month.

The company's marketing manager, Imad Qutob, on Tuesday said Thuisbezorgd wanted to offer customers more choice in how they pay.

The company says around half its customers pay cash on delivery. Others pay via the site using debit cards, credit cards, PayPal or an online system run by Dutch banks.

Paying with bitcoins could save customers a little change: Thuisbezorgd adds surcharges of up to one euro ($A1.43) for other forms of online payment.

Bitcoin is a cryptography-based digital currency that advocates say is counterfeit-proof.

Thank you:

1- http://bitcoinsinsider.com/ and
2- http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/latest-news/dutch-food-delivery-website-takes-bitcoins/story-e6frg90f-1226754123624

OK, here comes Russia.... Re-posted  from -  http://www.theverge.com/2013/10/12/4830688/russia-reportedly-planning-state-controlled-sputni...

Russia reportedly planning state-controlled 'Sputnik' search engine

OK, here comes Russia....

Re-posted from - http://www.theverge.com/2013/10/12/4830688/russia-reportedly-planning-state-controlled-sputnik-search-engine

In what appears to be a further attempt to censor the internet, Russia is reportedly building its own state-controlled search engine. The report comes from Russian newspaper Vedomosti, which claims that the search engine will be called Sputnik, and is being developed by state-owned telecom Rostelecom. It could potentially become the default search tool for government institutions. The telecom has reportedly invested more than $20 million in the project, and is attempting to lure talent from rival companies with hopes to launch the search engine early next year. However, even if the report is true, the search engine will likely have a tough time cracking the Russian market. Local company Yandex holds more than 60 percent market share in the country, with the likes of Google and other search engines filling out the rest. "With its lack of expertise, the venture is unlikely to meet with success," says VTB analyst Ivan Kim.